Spiders

Along came a spider…

Garden Spider (Araneus diadematus)

Spiders, the oft-maligned Arachnid, are so beneficial in so many ways. As we know, these garden-dwellers eat insects, which should endear them to us to some degree, at least. They are also a food source for birds, frogs, toads and other wildlife. In addition, their silken webs supply nesting materials for hummingbird nests. Spiders are actually harmless to people (with the exception of the black widow spider, which does reside in a few areas in Canada.) http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/what-we-do/resource-centre/featured-species/black-widow.html?referrer=https://www.google.ca/  They are also rather photogenic! This garden spider (above) spent a couple of months with us in 2015.

The yellow garden spiders pictured below were living in our rain garden in 2014.

The yellow garden spider (Argiope aurantia) is also commonly known as the black and yellow garden spider, golden garden spider, writing spider, and McKinley spider.
The yellow garden spider (Argiope aurantia) is also commonly known as the black and yellow garden spider, golden garden spider, writing spider, and McKinley spider.
The yellow garden spider (Argiope aurantia) is also commonly known as the black and yellow garden spider, golden garden spider, writing spider, and McKinley spider.
The yellow garden spider (Argiope aurantia)

 

Below, the gossamer product of the eight-legged predator and artisan._MG_0907.spider web on clothesline jpg

 

 

 

 

These goldenrod crab spiders are a favorite in the yard, laying in wait for their prey on various flower buds. Notice the silk production by the spider in the picture under this photo…

The goldenrod crab spider or flower (crab) spider (Misumena vatia)
The goldenrod crab spider or flower (crab) spider (Misumena vatia)
The goldenrod crab spider or flower (crab) spider (Misumena vatia)
The goldenrod crab spider or flower (crab) spider (Misumena vatia)

 

 

 

Below is a link to an excellent resource outlining a guide to spiders in Ontario.

A Guide to Some of Ontario’s Spiders