Protecting Pollinators in Landscape

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/uploads/resources/pdfs/ProtectPollinatorsInLandscape_FINAL-LowRes.pdf

Protecting Pollinators: A Guide

This 30-page pdf outlines the types of threats faced by pollinators and provides charts of the different categories of plants that support them – another excellent resource!

http://nativecology.com/site/2016/07/26/for-bees-the-best-native-plant-may-be-no-plant-at-all/

 

Wild Bees: A Landowners Guide to Conserving Native Pollinators in Ontario

Single Bumblebee DSCF4542

http://www.feedthebees.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/A-Landowners-Guide-to-Conserving-Native-Pollinators-in-Ontario.pdf

A valuable resource!

According to Allbirch Pollinator Garden in the Ottawa Valley,

“Sunflowers ( specifically Helianthus annuus) are native plants to North America and are the top pollinators. Beware cultivars that are pollenless, as they provide no protein to pollinators, but do offer nectar. That are many cultivars (over 200 in fact.) Here is the best resource for tracking down those best suited to your eye…”

Click on link below

https://myfolia.com/plants/20-sunflower-helianthus-annuus/varieties?letter=All

 

 

 

Spring Snow

A pine siskin braves the variable spring weather in the Ottawa Valley. This photo was taken through the window to avoid disturbing the birds flocking to the feeders. There seems to be an irruption of pine siskins this spring.

Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus) in contorted larch
Pine Siskin (Carduelis pinus) in contorted larch

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Go Wild

“This summer, WWF-Canada and TELUS are asking you to join us and Go Wild. Do you have an idea on how to help nature thrive in your community? Apply for a Go Wild Community Grant today!” Click on link below for info on how to apply for a grant…

http://www.wwf.ca/takeaction/gowild/?utm_source=WWF-Canada+Subscriber+List&utm_campaign=bc3c3765ee-GoWild_Apr2016_English&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f2217cbbde-bc3c3765ee-416542889

Black Cherry Trees for Wildlife

http://nativeplantwildlifegarden.com/black-cherry/

Black Cherry (Prunus serotine) Flower Buds
Black Cherry (Prunus serotine) Flower Buds

“Everything about Black Cherry ranks it as one of THE most important native trees for wildlife: (1) more birds feed on the fruits of this native tree than any other, (2) more butterflies and moths lay their eggs on this tree than any other tree, excepting the oaks, and (3) add to this mix its ornamental flower show in the spring.”

Mature Black Cherry Canopy in Bloom, May 2015 (Prunus serotina)
Mature Black Cherry Canopy in Bloom, May 2015 (Prunus serotina)

We have three of these mature trees in our wildlife-friendly yard, and one young tree. Only recently have we had the good fortune of finding a single seedling at the base of one of the trees, which I transplanted to another location. In our experience, these trees are not the least bit “weedy.” We can vouch for the incredible diversity of wildlife it attracts. We have seen most of the butterflies and birds listed in the article on our property, many of them right in these trees.

Black Cherry Drupes (Prunus serotina)
Black Cherry Drupes (Prunus serotina)

Click below to see wildlife attracted to wild (black) cherry, from caterpillars and butterflies to birds and mammals 🙂

https://the-natural-web.org/2016/06/03/black-cherry-for-wildlife-and-people-too/